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  • mono 8:12 pm on March 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , essay writing, how to write a lyric essay, , , , tips   

    Lia Purpura: “the form is a necessity of thought.” 

    Split Pink

    Although this article of notes on the lyric essay is from 2011, I am only now just discovering it and find this particular passage most engaging and illuminating–helpful in the craft of composition:

    This is Not a Lyric Essay (Robert Root, read by Harvey) The lyric essay might be considered as a kind of blurting of words: unplanned, spontaneous, first and final draft, charged. It has a kind of inadvertence. The lyric can be felt in the blood. Place is a lyric essay. Deborah Tall said of the lyric it partakes of the essay in its weight, in its desire to engage with facts, in its passion. The form is simultaneously essay and poem and music; attends language with precision and rigor but with a different vision from poetry about what it might achieve. The lyric is an entity in itself; embodies a sense of wholeness; is an essence; is not decorative. As Lia Purpura says: the form is a necessity of thought.

    via AWP Nonfiction Cheat Sheet: Friday Afternoon.

    Specific phrases that I admire are:

    1. “The lyric can be felt in the blood.”

    2. “…embodies a sense of wholeness; is an essence; is not decorative.”

    3. “As Lia Purpura says: the form is a necessity of thought.”

    I have read certain essays, felt them on a level below the intellect, a level that pierced the skin or stayed stuck on the skin, skin sticky with how the essay just wouldn’t fade after reading.

    Certain works, too, shine with a wholeness and a brevity, a sheen that bubbles up around them, a lasting power that incites more questions than answers. Textual power via ambiguity, images, fragments, the slice of a thought or a thought too wide and fragmented, that it must be cut to lend more power to the content it is expressing.

    “…the form is a necessity of thought.” By this, is she suggesting that the form crafts the thought or that the thought crafts the form? How do different forms influence or meld the way a thought’s meaning is attributed? Or, is this merely a call out from the traditional five paragraph essay of composition textbooks, a call to experiment with how, for instance, a personal narrative shifts and shatters under varying forms?

     
  • mono 9:29 pm on March 20, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , electric delirium, , fictionaut, , method, , , tips,   

    Creative Writing: How I Wrote Electric Delirium 

    Image

    Last month I published a series of ten lyric essays at Fictionaut. The collection, ELECTRIC DELIRIUM, was an experiment that I undertook for the sake of better understanding the work of two influential thinkers. Here was the basic approach:

    1. Take one page of notes from Lee Thayer’s, LEADERSHIP: THINKING, BEING, DOING noting interesting phrases, ideas, questions, diagrams, etc.

    2. Take one page of notes on one precis from E.M. Cioran’s A SHORT HISTORY OF DECAY noting interesting phrases, ideas, questions, diagrams, etc. 

    3. Read the notes separately and taken together. What happens when these two mental models rub up against each other? What thought-path bubbles to the surface? How can I make a connection between Thayer’s, Cioran’s, and my own thought?

    4. Make the connection. Make it work. Make is real. Make it strong. 

    5. Write the essay, but let the mind express the manifestation of the thoughts as it will. Blend story (both personal and fictional) with idea (sticking closely to the previously made connection) to create a piece that revolves around the intellectual connection between the two thinkers in the context of some unfolding narrative (in this case, a troupe of actors preparing for a performance). 

    6. Edit profusely: trim fat, grease, skin, gristle. 

    All in all, the results are satisfying, although I found myself making last minute edits even minutes before uploading each piece to Fictionaut. Now that they are public, I feel I can let them be, but fleshy essays like these, for me, are perpetual works-in-progress. I received some constructive and positive feedback from certain essays and for that I am content. 

    Although the link to my Tumblr where I have neatly arranged all of the essays has been given above, here it is again, if you are interested in reading ELECTRIC DELIRIUM

     

     
  • mono 2:58 pm on October 21, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 50, ability, easy, , increase, , , , , , , , tips,   

    50 Ways to Increase Your Japanese Language Ability (Study Techniques) 

    I have been studying Japanese for eight years. The first three years I studied at a university in the United States (studying and working for the university as a Japanese tutor). One year was spent working in South Korea and studying Japanese every morning with Korean adults (I was the only non-Korean student in the class). The latter four years have been me living and working in Japan, using Japanese on a daily basis and, for the most part, getting by quite well with the skills I have developed. I have experience in academic translation work, language consultation, education and interpretation.

    I’m not sure how relevant this will be to those learning a language other than Japanese, but if they are of use, then great, I’m happy to have helped contribute to your gain in competency.

    The following list is in no particular order. You decide which of these is more useful than the other and above all, use them. Thank you.

    1. Start with reading and writing as this will help you in the long run.
    2. Learn the hiragana syllabry perfectly and be able to write and recall it from memory.
    3. Learn the katakana syllabry perfectly and be able to write and recall it from memory.
    4. Learn a set number of kanji per day by writing them over and over and over again.
    5. Memorize at least 10 particles. If possible, buy a book specifically dealing with particles and learn as many as possible. You will thank yourself later.
    6. Increase and review your vocabulary on a daily basis.
    7. Practice pronunciation with native Japanese speakers.
    8. Have conversations with native Japanese speakers as much as possible.
    9. Learn how to say: “How do you say _______ in Japanese?” in Japanese.
    10. Watch Japanese movies with English subtitles and take notes.
    11. Watch English movies with Japanese subtitles and take notes.
    12. Watch Japanese movies with Japanese subtitles and take notes.
    13. Listen to Japanese music and pay attention to pronunciation.
    14. If possible, go to karaoke with Japanese friends and sing Japanese songs.
    15. Find articles written in Japanese about things that you are interested in. Read them even if you don’t understand every single kanji. Try to grasp the subject matter and explain it to someone else in Japanese.
    16. Buy a reliable paper dictionary. Spend an afternoon exploring it.
    17. Go to Japan by yourself for two weeks and interact as much as you can.
    18. When in Japan, ask random people for directions and listen carefully.
    19. Write your own paragraphs in Japanese and have a native speaker check them for you.
    20. Learn the difference between casual and formal Japanese.
    21. Learn “keigo” and learn how and when to use it.
    22. Listen to podcasts or radio broadcasts in Japanese.
    23. Listen to a Japanese speaker or celebrity whom you admire and mimic the way they talk. I recommend Ryuichi Sakamoto’s podcast.
    24. Learn about Japanese dialects and how they differ from each other.
    25. Learn how to read and write. I say this again as it will set you apart from other foreigners who can only speak. Plus, you will understand much more of what is happening around you.
    26. Learn about “aimai” and observe how people around you talk to one another.
    27. Write messages on your cellphone in Japanese. Learn the Japanese emoticon system.
    28. Study more kanji. Buy kanji flashcards and study the hell out of them.
    29. Take the JLPT tests or buy the study books and simply learn from them.
    30. Participate in a speech contest and practice your speech AT LEAST 500 times.
    31. Videotape yourself speaking Japanese and observe your pronunciation.
    32. Record your Japanese teacher’s lecture and listen closely.
    33. Record your own voice speaking Japanese and observe your own pronunciation.
    34. Speak to your Japanese friends on the telephone and observe how challenging it is when you cannot see the other person’s mouth.
    35. Pay attention to body language and mimic those around you (do this respectfully and subtly).
    36. Learn how to bow properly.
    37. Learn how to count things properly.
    38. If you come across a word that you don’t understand, ask someone.
    39. Organize a study group and meet weekly. Don’t just complain or watch anime, but STUDY together. Challenge each other.
    40. If you want to excel in a certain kind of career, learn as many words about that career as you can.
    41. Start a translation project of a book or article that you like.
    42. Once a month, go back and review ALL of the basics (grammar patterns, vocabulary, kanji, etc.).
    43. Become a master at asking questions.
    44. Enlist the help of a tutor or mentor, someone who can help you develop your skills.
    45. Re-read articles that you have read and note how your understanding has changed or how you have forgotten kanji that you were certain you already knew.
    46. Study Japanese “reiho,” or manners.
    47. Start teaching Japanese to others who are just beginning. Explaining the concepts will help give you a better grasp on them.
    48. Practice your reading and writing as much as possible.
    49. Listen to Japanese audio and speak along with it (again, imitation).
    50. Put yourself in reasonable situations where you MUST speak Japanese.

     
    • Justin 10:10 pm on October 21, 2008 Permalink

      This is excellent.

      I would only add one more: date a Japanese person, if possible. It makes available a whole world of opportunity separate from the experiences of a Japanese office or everyday living!

    • jgrefe 6:05 am on October 22, 2008 Permalink

      Justin,

      Thank you for your great insight.

      Dating is a key point that I seemed to have left out. My dear lady has transformed and edified my perception of this country in countless ways and I thank her for that.

    • claytonian 8:30 am on October 22, 2008 Permalink

      got podcast links for us?

    • jgrefe 1:32 pm on October 22, 2008 Permalink

      Claytonian, I subscribe to the Ryuichi Sakamoto podcast via iTunes, but here is a relevant URL. At the time of posting this, the page is loading very slowly for some reason: Sakamoto Podcast. I like the way he speaks Japanese. I also like Deep Osakan.

    • mikew 2:11 am on October 27, 2008 Permalink

      If possible & affordable, visit a
      Japanese restaurant at least once
      a week. Here in Cincinnati, we have
      2 Japanese buffets, one price & all you can eat! You’ll hear Japanese spoken by both the employees & patrons. It’s also a great cultural & culinary experience.

    • jgrefe 8:23 am on October 27, 2008 Permalink

      Mikew, thank you. Yes, I agree with you. Restaurants and, if you are of legal drinking age, bars are great places to learn, listen and experience.

      When in Cincinnati, I’ll have to keep an eye out for those restaurants.

    • Nikou 12:26 am on April 13, 2009 Permalink

      Hello,

      Great post for learning Japanese.

      Japanese is so hard for me. I’ve lived in Japan for 2 years but failed to speak fluently. Now, I’m in China, I’m having an easier time with Mandarin. I wrote a blog post about the difficulties I had learning Japanese over Chinese. TheShanghaiExpat. Please feel free to visit and let me know if you are interested with link exchange.

      Nikou

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